Upcoming Exhibitions

Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism

Sept. 12-Dec. 12, 2014

With works as varied as a Vidal Sassoon Salon from 1968, the U.S. Expo Pavilion in Seville, Spain in 1992, and his steel houses, this exhibit will present an overview of almost fifty years of architecture. Barton Myers first attracted attention in the late 1960s for his civic buildings and urban projects in Canada. He returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office and became known for his performing arts centers, campus buildings, and steel houses among many projects. 

The Barton Myers papers were donated to the Architecture and Design Collection of the AD&A Museum, UC Santa Barbara in 2000.  The archive covers Myers’s work from 1968 through 2002 and includes sketches and computer drawings, watercolors, images by well-known photographers, detailed study models and models of blocks-long sections of cities, as well as research notes, correspondence, lectures, and writings. 

Image: A.J. Diamond and Barton Myers; Wolf House, 1974; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; designed by Barton Myers. Photo Credit: John Fulker, Courtesy of the West Vancouver Museum.

Artist-in-Residence: Eric Beltz, The Cave of Treasures

Eric Beltz, in-progress drawing of Medusa's Totem Pole, 2014, graphite on Bristol. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Tony Mastres.

Sept. 12-May 1, 2015

As the 2014 Artist-in-Residence, Eric Beltz will present an ambitious new project, The Cave of Treasures, a dramatic departure for the artist who is known for his intimately scaled, highly-detailed graphite drawings. The title refers to three recurring themes in Beltz’s work that are commonly understood as harmful- Medusa, poison oak, and the swastika- and is rooted in the artist’s academic research into legends, tragedies, misinterpretations, and evolutions of iconography surrounding mythological figures, plants, and symbols. These interests manifest in a large-scale wall drawing, in silver ink on black paper, and a wood and concrete sculpture containing live plants. Collectively, they serve as a meditative interpretation of nature, fear, seduction, and repulsion. The Cave of Treasures is Beltz’s first solo Museum exhibition and represents the ten-year anniversary of the artist’s graduation from UC Santa Barbara.

Image: Eric Beltz, in-progress drawing of Medusa's Totem Pole, 2014, graphite on Bristol. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Tony Mastres.

Bollywood 101: The Visual Culture of the Bollywood Film Poster

Film poster: Chennai Express, 2013, ink on paper, hand-drawn and printed, 20 x 30 in. Museum purchase.

Sept. 12-Dec. 12, 2014

The Indian film industry, or Bollywood, is the world’s largest producer of films, releasing more than one thousand films a year. These films display a spectacular blend of romance, melodrama, fantasy, song, and dance extravaganza. This exhibition explores the history of Bollywood posters and their influence on popular culture, religion, and art. Showcased alongside the film posters are prints, calendars, images of temples dedicated to Bollywood film stars, as well as wedding posters, and other appropriations both personal and commercial. Along with the exhibition, a Bollywood film screening, and a symposium will also be held.

Image: Film poster: Chennai Express, 2013, ink on paper, hand-drawn and printed, 20 x 30 in. Museum purchase.

Surface: The Handcrafted Object

Image: Robert Arneson, Ear Brick, 1968, ceramic with partial glaze, 4¾ x 14½ x 3¼ in. Ruth S. Schaffner Collection. Photo by Tony Mastres.

Sept. 12-Dec. 12, 2014

This exhibition brings together handcrafted sculptures that highlight the enduring appeal of objects that emphasize process and materials. These works demonstrate the primary role of the artist in every aspect of their production, from conception through execution. Will Simons, CCS ‘09, approaches the material as an artist, using his own practice and aesthetic as his curatorial inspiration. He has also considered the University’s celebrated ceramics and foundry programs, no longer extant, which fostered the use of many traditional techniques in innovative ways. Artists in the exhibition include former UCSB faculty and students such as Rollin Fortier, Yoshiro Ikeda, Sheldon Kaganoff, Robert Thomas and others, as well as such internationally known artists as: Robert Arneson, Magdalene Odundo, George Rickey and Beatrice Wood.

Image: Robert Arneson, Ear Brick, 1968, ceramic with partial glaze, 4¾ x 14½ x 3¼ in. Ruth S. Schaffner Collection. Photo by Tony Mastres.

How to Make the Universe Right

Jan 16- May 1, 2015

How to Make the Universe Right presents an unprecedented group of scrolls and ceremonial objects of the Yao people and other groups from Vietnam and Southern China. This rich tradition of Shamanist practice brings together Daoist and Buddhist deities, Confucian ancestor worship, and Animism.

These scroll paintings, costumes, masks, instruments and the other ceremonial objects represent an unbroken link to the past of Asian mountain cultures whose roots go back 2000 years. Scrolls vary in number from sets of three to complete sets of seventeen or more depending on the shaman’s stature and the intended purpose of the work. The com

 

plete Daoist pantheon is usually represented, including the Three Pure Ones, the Jade Emperor, and Master of Saints. The spiritual stories represented in the scroll paintings also include celestial beings such as the Three Merciful Ones, the Four Heavenly Messengers, and the Ten Kings of Hell, and divine animals such as tigers, dragons, lion-dogs, and others.

With the help of scrolls and other spiritual objects, such as the ones exhibited in this show, the shamans guide their people’s vital spiritual life binding them together and helping them “make the universe right.”

shaman

Image: Courtesy of Jill and Barry Kitnick